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Psychology & Diet

nutritional profile and benefits of this delicious fruit

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Presse Santé

For centuries, mangoes, these tropical fruits have been prized for their sweet, lively flavor. More recently, research has highlighted additional benefits in the form of key nutrients that help people fight disease, maintain a healthy weight, and even prevent certain signs of aging.

Like peaches and cherries, mangoes are known as stone fruits due to their central pit, which is easily recognized by its large size and flattened-oval shape. Mangoes are native to India, but today they grow in abundance in Mexico, South America. Once considered exotic, mangoes are now available in most supermarkets and are a common ingredient in many dishes due to their popular flavor and versatility. It’s delicious sliced, chopped, pureed, juiced, and even roasted. Here’s everything you need to know about mangoes, including their nutritional content and health benefits, plus other ways to enjoy them.

Nutritional profile of mangoes

1 cup of mango cut into pieces contains:
99 calories
1 gram (g) of protein
6g fat
25g of carbohydrates
3g fiber
23g of sugars
89 micrograms (mcg) of vitamin A
7 mcg of vitamin K
60 milligrams (mg) of vitamin C
277mg potassium

What are the potential health benefits of mangoes?

Research conducted on mangoes has found that they may provide a number of nutritional benefits, including:

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enhanced immunity

Mangoes are rich in vitamin C, which strengthens the immune system. A one cup serving provides two-thirds of the vitamin C you need in a day. Vitamin C plays an important role in the body’s healing process, helping it to form blood vessels, cartilage, muscle, and bone collagen.

Protection against damage caused by free radicals

Free radicals are compounds that are associated with many chronic diseases and aging in general. The high levels of antioxidants, including beta-carotene and vitamin C, found in mangoes help protect cells against free radical damage. They are also a source of phytochemicals, which are plant compounds known to have health-promoting properties. Certain phytochemicals in mango, including phenolic acids, mangiferin, carotenoids, and gallotannins, have been linked to anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antiobesity, and anticancer effects.

Improved digestive health

One cup of mango contains about 3 g of fiber, or about 10% of what you need in a day. Dietary fiber has long been recognized as essential for digestive health. Also, according to a study published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, mangoes significantly improve constipation, including stool frequency and consistency. In this study, mango was found to be more effective than a supplement that provided the same amount of fiber (300 grams). One possible reason, according to the study authors: Eating mangoes may increase healthy fatty acids and gastric secretions that aid digestion.

cancer prevention

Research has shown that fruits and vegetables that contain carotenoids, including mangoes, may help reduce the risk of colon cancer. Similarly, early research indicates that the micronutrients in mangoes may help reduce colon and breast cancer cells. Results of a mouse study, published in Nutrition Research, showed that dietary mango reduced tumor size and suppressed cancer growth factors. (Of course, more human research is needed.)

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sleep better

Mangos contain vitamin B6, which is responsible for the production of serotonin, a chemical that promotes sleep and regulates our mood. Three-quarters of a cup of mango normally covers 8% of your daily vitamin B6 needs.

a clearer vision

Mangoes contain antioxidants, lutein and zeaxanthin, as well as vitamin A, which help protect our eyes and reduce the risk of macular degeneration. Although more research is needed to determine the exact link between zeaxanthin and age-related macular degeneration, this specific antioxidant may increase the concentration of macular pigment, leading to healthier eyes.

Helps with inflammatory diseases.

Many nutrients in mangoes, including antioxidants and vitamin C, have anti-inflammatory effects. People with arthritis and other inflammatory conditions can benefit from eating mangoes.

Improved cardiovascular and intestinal health.

Eating two cups of mangoes daily was beneficial for systolic blood pressure in healthy postmenopausal women, according to findings presented at the 2018 meeting of the American Society for Nutrition. This is likely due to polyphenols (such as mangiferin, quercetin, gallotannins and gallic acid) contained in the fruit, the study authors theorized. It is clear that mangoes can be part of a balanced diet and help you stay healthy. But they are not a panacea and do not magically cure or prevent disease, and they cannot compensate for poor nutrition.

How to choose and store mangoes

Mangoes can be found in supermarkets throughout the year.

Choose mangoes that have a good balance between firmness and sweetness. Ripe mangoes are more yellow and reddish. If you buy ripe mangoes, keep them in the refrigerator. If you choose green mangoes, leave them at room temperature. To extend the shelf life of ripe mangoes, consider freezing them. Cut them into cubes and put them in a zip-lock bag. This will give you a supply on hand to make smoothies. Slicing fruit can be difficult. This is due to the wide, flat core in the middle. You should use the hole as a guide to slide the knife over the fruit. There are tutorials online that show how to cut mangoes correctly.

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how to eat mangoes

You can enjoy mango on its own as a sweet snack, but its tropical flavor pairs well with many other foods. Cut it into slices and add it to smoothies, yogurts or desserts. Mango can also be used in savory dishes and can be roasted to caramelize its natural sugars.

Dessert Idea: Mix diced mangoes, pineapples, and kiwis with lemon and lime juice, and add grated ginger.

* HealthKey strives to convey health knowledge in a language accessible to all. In NO EVENT can the information provided replace the opinion of a health professional.

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Psychology & Diet

Is it healthy fast food or a marketing gimmick?

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Presse Santé

Are muesli and granola really healthier breakfast options, or are they just a marketing gimmick? If you’re looking to optimize your health through diet, it helps to know exactly what you’re eating, but with all the breakfast options out there, it can be hard to decide. This article will walk you through the nutritional facts of cereals and muesli/granola, from their comparative fiber content to calorie levels and even possible additives. Try to understand how these products fuel your body so you can make more informed decisions when choosing a product for your most important meal of the day!

Muesli, granola, classic cereals: the nutritional value changes from one product to another.

Traditional whole grains, granola and muesli are excellent sources of nutrition and each offer their own benefits. Traditional whole grains, such as quinoa, oats, barley, and millet, are rich in vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber. They also provide a variety of essential antioxidants that help protect against disease and promote overall health.

Granola is a breakfast cereal made from oats combined with nuts, seeds, and dried fruits. It is high in fiber and low in fat, making it a great choice for those looking to limit their calorie intake. Muesli is a mixture of rolled oats, dried fruit, nuts, and seeds. It is usually served cold or soaked overnight in milk or yogurt for a sweeter taste. Although higher in calories than traditional whole grains or granola due to ingredients such as dried fruit that contain added sugars, muesli provides many essential nutrients such as iron and magnesium.

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Compared to traditional whole grains, granola and muesli offer a wider range of flavors thanks to the added ingredients they contain. On the other hand, it should be taken into account when choosing food, because they contain more calories. These three products are good sources of nutrition and can be an ideal complement to any balanced diet. However, it is worth carefully considering the nutrient profile before opting for one or the other.

How to choose the best for your health?

  1. Look for one that offers you nutritional balance:

First, look for a product that provides the right amount of nutrition for your health needs. Make sure it contains a good balance of nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, as well as dietary fiber and healthy fats. Whole grains such as oats or whole wheat can provide these important nutrients.

  1. Check its sugar and salt content:

Some granolas are high in sugar due to sweeteners or nuts that may be added. Instead, opt for granolas and mueslis with enough sugar from natural sources like honey or fruit juice concentrates, without too much added sugar. Also check the salt content of the product; choose those with less than 0.3g of salt per 100g to limit your sodium intake.

  1. Do not hesitate to also check its fat content:

It is also worth checking the fat content of the granola/muesli you have chosen. Some are higher in saturated fat than others, which is not good for our cardiovascular health. Instead, choose products that contain healthier unsaturated fats, such as those found in nuts and seeds. Finally, look for products that are fortified with additional vitamins and minerals, which is especially helpful if you’re looking to give your breakfast cereal an extra nutritional boost.

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Balanced and conscious diet: if they are nutritious and healthy, they should not be abused!!

According UK National Health Service, the recommended amount per serving of granola/muesli is 30-40g and should be consumed 2-3 times a week for the best health effect. Eating too much muesli or granola can increase your calorie and sugar intake, so it’s important to watch your diet carefully if you choose to include it as part of your diet.

* HealthKey strives to convey health knowledge in a language accessible to all. In NO EVENT can the information provided replace the opinion of a health professional.

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Psychology & Diet

What happens if you eat these 10 foods with 2-in-1 effects at night?

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Presse Santé

Sleep is one of the most essential aspects of our health and well-being. Yet too many people struggle to find the restful sleep they need. If creating a healthy sleep environment, such as establishing consistent bedtimes and limiting distractions, can help improve sleep quality. It can also be beneficial to focus on what our bodies are taking in during the day to help ease the transition to restful sleep at night. Eating certain foods throughout the day has been shown to be particularly beneficial for improving digestion and allowing us to fall asleep naturally. Keep reading and discover 10 foods that promote both digestion and sleep!

  1. Bananas:

Not only are they delicious, but bananas are packed with magnesium and potassium, two minerals that can help relax muscles and reduce stress. Plus, its high fiber content aids digestion, so you won’t feel bloated or dizzy before bed.

  1. Camomile tea:

This herbal tea is known for its calming effects, but it is also useful for aiding digestion thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties. It can soothe an upset stomach, relieve cramps, and ease bloating.

  1. oatmeal :

A bowl of oatmeal is a great option for those looking for digestive benefits and better quality of sleep. Oats contain complex carbohydrates that slow the absorption of sugars into the blood and prevent waking up in the middle of the night with cravings. Plus, it’s packed with antioxidants and magnesium, a mineral you need for a good night’s rest.

  1. Greek yogurt:

Eating yogurt before bed is another way to make sure your digestive system doesn’t suffer overnight. Yogurt contains probiotics that act like beneficial bacteria that help your digestive tract function properly while you sleep. It also provides a dose of tryptophan, an amino acid that increases serotonin levels in the brain to ensure sleep quality is improved too!

  1. almonds :

This versatile nut is packed with healthy fats and proteins that digest slowly overnight while you rest easy. No more rumbling stomachs in the middle of the night! Additionally, almonds contain melatonin which helps regulate your body’s internal clock so you fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer.

  1. Honey :

If you have trouble falling asleep at night or if you wake up frequently during the night, honey may be just the thing for you! Consuming this natural sweetener helps stabilize blood sugar levels, which promotes relaxation. And since it has antimicrobial properties, it can help improve gut health for better digestion overall!

  1. Cherries:

Rich in melatonin, cherries work wonders when it comes to improving sleep quality and digestion at the same time. By eating cherries regularly (fresh or dried), you’ll avoid an upset stomach thanks to their anti-inflammatory properties, not to mention delicious!

  1. Fish :

Eating fish at night can help the digestive system to better process food while providing the body with nutrients that contribute to restful sleep. Research supports these benefits, as studies show that increasing omega-3 fatty acids through fish consumption can lead to improved postprandial glucose metabolism and symptoms of digestive difficulties. Additionally, research shows that eating tryptophan-rich foods can lead to a significant increase in serotonin levels. A neurotransmitter associated with calm and sleep promotion.

  1. Peanut Butter Toast:

Peanut butter toast is not only delicious, it is also very effective in promoting better digestion and better sleep habits. The toast contains whole grains that take time to break down, while the peanuts provide healthy fats and long-lasting energy, perfect for keeping your tummy happy until morning!

  1. Pumpkin seeds:

Pumpkin seeds can be a great way to take care of your digestion and help you sleep better. Rich in dietary fiber, healthy fats, potassium, zinc, iron, and magnesium, pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of several minerals that help support good digestion. Like Greek yogurt, they are rich in tryptophan to help you relax and find a restful sleep. Eat just two tablespoons of pumpkin seeds each day. Whether grilled or raw, adding them to salads or having them as a between-meal snack can have valuable benefits when it comes to improving digestion and promoting restful, restful sleep. .

* HealthKey strives to convey health knowledge in a language accessible to all. In NO EVENT can the information provided replace the opinion of a health professional.

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Psychology & Diet

9 little-known signs of magnesium deficiency

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Presse Santé

Magnesium is arguably the most important mineral in the body, which is why magnesium deficiency can be such a big problem. Magnesium not only helps regulate calcium, potassium, and sodium, but it is also essential for cellular health and is a critical component of more than 300 biochemical functions in the body.

Even glutathione, the most powerful antioxidant in the body, which has even been called “the main antioxidant”, needs magnesium for its synthesis. Unfortunately, most people don’t know this, and millions of people suffer from magnesium deficiency on a daily basis without even knowing it. Severe, long-term deficiency can also contribute to more serious health problems, including kidney and liver damage, peroxynitrite damage that can lead to migraines, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, or Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s and osteoporosis due to malabsorption of vitamin D. . and calcium.

How do you know if you have a magnesium deficiency and can benefit from supplementation?

It can be difficult to accurately assess a person’s magnesium deficiency, so paying attention to their symptoms is recommended.

Who is most likely to suffer from magnesium deficiency?

Not everyone is the same when it comes to magnesium metabolism and assimilation. In fact, some people are inherently at higher risk of developing magnesium deficiency.
Magnesium deficiency can be inherited genetically in the form of an inability to absorb this important mineral. Similarly, a diet low in magnesium-rich foods or even emotional or work-related stress can drain magnesium from the body. Whether it is hereditary, due to poor nutrition, or even stress, a magnesium deficiency can lead to side effects such as migraines, diabetes, fatigue, etc.

The four most important risk groups are:

1. People with gastrointestinal disorders

It really all starts in the gut. Since most magnesium is absorbed in the small intestine, conditions such as celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, and regional enteritis tend to cause magnesium deficiency. Similarly, people who choose to have bowel surgery, such as a small bowel resection or bypass surgery, are vulnerable to magnesium deficiency.

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2. People with type II diabetes

Partly due to increased urination, type II diabetics and people with insulin resistance are known to have difficulty absorbing magnesium properly. Lowering the glucose concentration in the kidneys through natural dietary modifications can be extremely helpful for these patients.

3. The elderly

For various reasons, magnesium levels decline with age. First, studies have shown that older people simply don’t eat magnesium-rich foods like they did when they were younger. This phenomenon is relatively easy to correct. However, the uncontrollable risk factor is that as we age, we naturally experience reduced intestinal magnesium absorption, reduced bone magnesium stores, and excessive urinary loss.

4. People struggling with alcohol addiction.

Alcoholics often experience magnesium deficiency due to a combination of the above reasons. The easiest way to understand this is to think of alcohol as an “antinutrient.” It literally sucks nutrients out of your cells and prevents the proper absorption/utilization of the vitamins and minerals you consume. Drinking one or two glasses of wine per week is fine for most people, but drinking much more is very taxing on the liver. Alcohol can also deplete your body of minerals by causing dehydration, an imbalance in your gut flora, immune system damage, sleep disturbances, and premature aging.

Symptoms

Many people may be deficient in magnesium without even knowing it. Here are some key symptoms to look out for that could indicate if you are deficient:

1. Leg cramps

70% of adults and 7% of children experience leg cramps regularly. It turns out that leg cramps can be more than just a nuisance. They can also be downright heinous! Due to magnesium’s role in neuromuscular signals and muscle contraction, researchers have found that magnesium deficiency is often to blame.
More and more healthcare professionals are prescribing magnesium supplements to help their patients. Another warning sign of magnesium deficiency is restless leg syndrome. To overcome leg cramps and restless leg syndrome, you need to increase your intake of magnesium and potassium.

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2. Insomnia

Magnesium deficiency is often the precursor to sleep disorders such as anxiety, hyperactivity, and restlessness. It has been suggested that this is because magnesium is vital for GABA function, an inhibitory neurotransmitter known to “calm” the brain and promote relaxation. Taking around 400 milligrams of magnesium before bed or with dinner is the best time of day to take the supplement. Also, adding magnesium-rich foods to dinner, such as nutrient-dense spinach, can help.

3. Muscle Pain/Fibromyalgia

A study published in Magnesium Research examined the role of magnesium in fibromyalgia symptoms. He found that higher magnesium intake reduced pain and tenderness and also improved blood markers of the immune system. Often linked to autoimmune disorders, this research should encourage fibromyalgia patients as it highlights the systemic effects of magnesium supplementation in the body.

4. Anxiety

Since magnesium deficiency can affect the central nervous system, and specifically the GABA cycle in the body, its side effects can include irritability and nervousness. When the deficiency worsens, it causes high levels of anxiety and, in severe cases, depression and hallucinations. In fact, magnesium has been shown to help calm the body and muscles and improve mood. It is a vital mineral for general mood. People with anxiety have seen great results from taking magnesium daily.
Magnesium is required for all cellular functions, from the gut to the brain, so it’s no wonder it affects so many systems.

5. High blood pressure

Magnesium works in association with calcium to maintain proper blood pressure and protect the heart. So when you’re deficient in magnesium, you’re often low in calcium as well, and you tend to have high blood pressure. A study of 241,378 participants and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that a diet rich in magnesium could reduce the risk of stroke by 8%. This is a considerable advance considering that hypertension is the cause of 50% of ischemic strokes worldwide.

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6. Type II diabetes

One of the four main causes of magnesium deficiency is type II diabetes, but it is also a common symptom. British researchers, for example, showed that of the 1,452 adults they examined, low magnesium levels were 10 times more common in new diabetics and 8.6 times more common in known diabetics. As might be expected from these data, a magnesium-rich diet has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, due to magnesium’s role in sugar metabolism. Another study found that simply adding magnesium supplements (100 milligrams per day) reduced the risk of diabetes by 15%!

7. Fatigue

Lack of energy, weakness, and fatigue are common symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Most patients with chronic fatigue syndrome are also deficient in magnesium. Between 300 and 1,000 milligrams of magnesium per day can help, but you should also be careful because too much magnesium can also cause diarrhea. If you experience this side effect, you can simply lower your dose a bit until the side effect wears off.

8. Migraines

Magnesium deficiency has been linked to migraines due to its importance in balancing neurotransmitters in the body. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have shown that 360 to 600 milligrams of magnesium daily can reduce the frequency of migraines by up to 42%.

9. Osteoporosis

The average person’s body contains about 25 grams of magnesium, about half of which is found in the bones. This is important to realize, especially for older people, who are at risk of weakening bones. Fortunately, there is hope! A study published in Biology Trace Element Research found that magnesium supplementation “significantly” delayed the development of osteoporosis after just 30 days. In addition to taking a magnesium supplement, you should also consider taking more vitamin D3 and K2 to naturally build bone density.

* HealthKey strives to convey health knowledge in a language accessible to all. In NO EVENT can the information provided replace the opinion of a health professional.

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