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Psychology & Diet

Are potatoes good for health?

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Presse Santé

The potato is a staple in Western cuisine, often used as a side dish for protein and vegetables. This vegetable is inexpensive, available worldwide, and relatively easy to grow. So are potatoes good for your health, and if so, how much should you eat?

These are underground tubers that grow on the roots of potato plants and are one of the most popular tubers. Today, many types of potatoes can be found at any local grocery store, but the humble white potato remains a favorite and classic fall vegetable. It is typically baked, mashed, and fried, and added to countless recipes, from casseroles to savory pies.

health benefits

Potatoes alone offer a host of health benefits thanks to their impressive nutritional content. Remember, though, that if you start adding toppings, such as cheese, sour cream, bacon, or excess salt, or snacking on things like French fries, you’ll negate some of these potential benefits. . If you pay attention to your portions and toppings, potatoes have the following health benefits:

1. High in fiber

Potatoes are a good source of dietary fiber, which is essential for digestive health. Eating high-fiber foods promotes regularity, aids in weight loss, and improves cardiovascular health. Fiber also promotes healthy cholesterol levels.

2. High in vitamin C

Potatoes are considered an excellent source of antioxidants and vitamin C, a micronutrient that plays a role in maintaining the body’s connective tissue, protecting the heart, enhancing immunity, and stimulating the absorption of other nutrients consumed. Research shows that vitamin C also promotes healthy skin and the formation of collagen, an important protein that aids in wound healing and is used to form blood vessels, ligaments, and tendons. As adults age, their collagen production declines, so it is beneficial to consume foods that contain vitamin C.

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3. Helps digestion with prebiotics

The resistant starch found in potatoes serves as a prebiotic, an indigestible fiber compound that helps feed probiotics in the gut. Research suggests that increasing your intake of prebiotics may improve gut health and the body’s response to stress, reduce inflammation, promote weight loss, and improve digestion.

4. A good source of potassium

Potatoes are a good source of potassium, an essential nutrient needed to maintain fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. Potassium is also necessary for various bodily functions, such as maintaining hydration and allowing organs like the heart, kidneys, and brain to function properly. Studies show that eating potassium-rich foods promotes heart health, helps lower blood pressure, lowers the risk of stroke, and may even prevent PMS cramps and muscle weakness.

5. Contains vitamin B6

Although not as rich in vitamin B6 as animal meat, beans, and seeds, potatoes are a good source of this micronutrient and therefore help support a healthy metabolism and other important bodily functions. Thanks to their vitamin B6 content, potatoes help maintain brain function, improve mood, protect eye health, and reduce inflammation.

Potato Nutrition Facts (and Types)

Potatoes contain bioactive plant compounds that have health-promoting properties, such as lutein, chlorogenic acid, and glycoalkaloids. They are also rich in fiber and micronutrients.

A medium-sized (about 173 grams) baked potato with skin contains approximately the following:

161 calories
36.6 grams of carbohydrates
4.3 grams of protein
0.2 grams of fat
3.8 grams of fiber
16.6 milligrams of vitamin C (28% of the daily value)
0.5 milligrams of vitamin B6 (27% of daily intake)
926 milligrams of potassium (26% of daily intake)
0.4 milligrams of manganese (19% of the daily intake)
2.4 milligrams of niacin (12% of the daily value)
48.4 micrograms of folic acid (12% of the daily value)
48.4 milligrams of magnesium (12% DV)
121 milligrams of phosphorus (12% DV)
1.9 milligrams of iron (10% DV)
0.2 milligrams of copper (10% DV)
0.1 milligrams of thiamine (7% DV)
0.7 milligrams pantothenic acid (7% DV)
0.1 milligrams of riboflavin (5% DV)
3.5 micrograms of vitamin K (4% of the daily value)
0.6 milligrams of zinc (4% of the daily value).

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Potatoes come in all different shapes, sizes, and colors. The most common types of potatoes are:

White and Red Potatoes: White, red, and yellow potatoes are among the most common. They are cheap and easy to incorporate into meals. While other types of potatoes have higher nutritional value, these are good sources of fiber, vitamin C, potassium, and vitamin B6. Sweet potatoes: Sweet potatoes have an impressive nutritional profile, containing more fiber than white sweet potatoes, as well as more than 400% of the recommended daily value for vitamin A. They are also rich in vitamin C, manganese, vitamin B6, and potassium.

Purple Potatoes: Purple potatoes have an earthy, nutty flavor and offer similar micronutrient levels to white potatoes. They are good sources of vitamin C and potassium and contain a decent amount of protein per serving.

How to choose, cook and use

Potatoes are available year-round in grocery stores. A raw potato has a shelf life of about a week and can be stored at room temperature. Look for a firm potato with smooth skin and no cracks, bruises, or cuts. Before cooking, clean the skin of any residual dirt, but keep the skin on if possible.

There are many ways to prepare potatoes and add them to meals. They can be:

porridge
baked
toasts
Chips
in the microwave

If you eat potatoes for their nutritional value, your best options are to bake, roast, or microwave them. These methods reduce nutrient loss and do not require cooking oils.

* HealthKey strives to convey health knowledge in a language accessible to all. In NO EVENT can the information provided replace the opinion of a health professional.

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Psychology & Diet

9 little-known signs of magnesium deficiency

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Presse Santé

Magnesium is arguably the most important mineral in the body, which is why magnesium deficiency can be such a big problem. Magnesium not only helps regulate calcium, potassium, and sodium, but it is also essential for cellular health and is a critical component of more than 300 biochemical functions in the body.

Even glutathione, the most powerful antioxidant in the body, which has even been called “the main antioxidant”, needs magnesium for its synthesis. Unfortunately, most people don’t know this, and millions of people suffer from magnesium deficiency on a daily basis without even knowing it. Severe, long-term deficiency can also contribute to more serious health problems, including kidney and liver damage, peroxynitrite damage that can lead to migraines, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, or Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s and osteoporosis due to malabsorption of vitamin D. . and calcium.

How do you know if you have a magnesium deficiency and can benefit from supplementation?

It can be difficult to accurately assess a person’s magnesium deficiency, so paying attention to their symptoms is recommended.

Who is most likely to suffer from magnesium deficiency?

Not everyone is the same when it comes to magnesium metabolism and assimilation. In fact, some people are inherently at higher risk of developing magnesium deficiency.
Magnesium deficiency can be inherited genetically in the form of an inability to absorb this important mineral. Similarly, a diet low in magnesium-rich foods or even emotional or work-related stress can drain magnesium from the body. Whether it is hereditary, due to poor nutrition, or even stress, a magnesium deficiency can lead to side effects such as migraines, diabetes, fatigue, etc.

The four most important risk groups are:

1. People with gastrointestinal disorders

It really all starts in the gut. Since most magnesium is absorbed in the small intestine, conditions such as celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, and regional enteritis tend to cause magnesium deficiency. Similarly, people who choose to have bowel surgery, such as a small bowel resection or bypass surgery, are vulnerable to magnesium deficiency.

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2. People with type II diabetes

Partly due to increased urination, type II diabetics and people with insulin resistance are known to have difficulty absorbing magnesium properly. Lowering the glucose concentration in the kidneys through natural dietary modifications can be extremely helpful for these patients.

3. The elderly

For various reasons, magnesium levels decline with age. First, studies have shown that older people simply don’t eat magnesium-rich foods like they did when they were younger. This phenomenon is relatively easy to correct. However, the uncontrollable risk factor is that as we age, we naturally experience reduced intestinal magnesium absorption, reduced bone magnesium stores, and excessive urinary loss.

4. People struggling with alcohol addiction.

Alcoholics often experience magnesium deficiency due to a combination of the above reasons. The easiest way to understand this is to think of alcohol as an “antinutrient.” It literally sucks nutrients out of your cells and prevents the proper absorption/utilization of the vitamins and minerals you consume. Drinking one or two glasses of wine per week is fine for most people, but drinking much more is very taxing on the liver. Alcohol can also deplete your body of minerals by causing dehydration, an imbalance in your gut flora, immune system damage, sleep disturbances, and premature aging.

Symptoms

Many people may be deficient in magnesium without even knowing it. Here are some key symptoms to look out for that could indicate if you are deficient:

1. Leg cramps

70% of adults and 7% of children experience leg cramps regularly. It turns out that leg cramps can be more than just a nuisance. They can also be downright heinous! Due to magnesium’s role in neuromuscular signals and muscle contraction, researchers have found that magnesium deficiency is often to blame.
More and more healthcare professionals are prescribing magnesium supplements to help their patients. Another warning sign of magnesium deficiency is restless leg syndrome. To overcome leg cramps and restless leg syndrome, you need to increase your intake of magnesium and potassium.

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2. Insomnia

Magnesium deficiency is often the precursor to sleep disorders such as anxiety, hyperactivity, and restlessness. It has been suggested that this is because magnesium is vital for GABA function, an inhibitory neurotransmitter known to “calm” the brain and promote relaxation. Taking around 400 milligrams of magnesium before bed or with dinner is the best time of day to take the supplement. Also, adding magnesium-rich foods to dinner, such as nutrient-dense spinach, can help.

3. Muscle Pain/Fibromyalgia

A study published in Magnesium Research examined the role of magnesium in fibromyalgia symptoms. He found that higher magnesium intake reduced pain and tenderness and also improved blood markers of the immune system. Often linked to autoimmune disorders, this research should encourage fibromyalgia patients as it highlights the systemic effects of magnesium supplementation in the body.

4. Anxiety

Since magnesium deficiency can affect the central nervous system, and specifically the GABA cycle in the body, its side effects can include irritability and nervousness. When the deficiency worsens, it causes high levels of anxiety and, in severe cases, depression and hallucinations. In fact, magnesium has been shown to help calm the body and muscles and improve mood. It is a vital mineral for general mood. People with anxiety have seen great results from taking magnesium daily.
Magnesium is required for all cellular functions, from the gut to the brain, so it’s no wonder it affects so many systems.

5. High blood pressure

Magnesium works in association with calcium to maintain proper blood pressure and protect the heart. So when you’re deficient in magnesium, you’re often low in calcium as well, and you tend to have high blood pressure. A study of 241,378 participants and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that a diet rich in magnesium could reduce the risk of stroke by 8%. This is a considerable advance considering that hypertension is the cause of 50% of ischemic strokes worldwide.

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6. Type II diabetes

One of the four main causes of magnesium deficiency is type II diabetes, but it is also a common symptom. British researchers, for example, showed that of the 1,452 adults they examined, low magnesium levels were 10 times more common in new diabetics and 8.6 times more common in known diabetics. As might be expected from these data, a magnesium-rich diet has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, due to magnesium’s role in sugar metabolism. Another study found that simply adding magnesium supplements (100 milligrams per day) reduced the risk of diabetes by 15%!

7. Fatigue

Lack of energy, weakness, and fatigue are common symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Most patients with chronic fatigue syndrome are also deficient in magnesium. Between 300 and 1,000 milligrams of magnesium per day can help, but you should also be careful because too much magnesium can also cause diarrhea. If you experience this side effect, you can simply lower your dose a bit until the side effect wears off.

8. Migraines

Magnesium deficiency has been linked to migraines due to its importance in balancing neurotransmitters in the body. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have shown that 360 to 600 milligrams of magnesium daily can reduce the frequency of migraines by up to 42%.

9. Osteoporosis

The average person’s body contains about 25 grams of magnesium, about half of which is found in the bones. This is important to realize, especially for older people, who are at risk of weakening bones. Fortunately, there is hope! A study published in Biology Trace Element Research found that magnesium supplementation “significantly” delayed the development of osteoporosis after just 30 days. In addition to taking a magnesium supplement, you should also consider taking more vitamin D3 and K2 to naturally build bone density.

* HealthKey strives to convey health knowledge in a language accessible to all. In NO EVENT can the information provided replace the opinion of a health professional.

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Psychology & Diet

Top 9 Essential Winter Superfoods for Iron Health

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Presse Santé

Winter is the time for hearty soups and stews and cravings for comfort food. But it can be hard to get enough vitamins and minerals with some of these heavier dishes. Fear not – there are plenty of nutrient-dense winter superfoods that can easily be added to your meal rotation this season to give you that nutritional boost you need!

From sweet potatoes to kelp, these 9 winter superfoods are sure to supply your body with essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, while adding an extra layer of flavor and texture to your favorite foods. So if you’re looking for ways to boost your health this winter or just add something special to your dinner tonight, keep reading!

  1. Goji berries:

Known for their therapeutic properties, goji berries have been a superfood used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine. They are full of antioxidants, vitamins A and C, iron, zinc, selenium, and other minerals. Goji berries also contain 18 unique types of amino acids and polysaccharides that can help boost the immune system. In addition to being a great source of nutrition, these sweet and sour berries also have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties that can help protect against winter illnesses.

  1. Spirulina:

This blue-green microalgae is a true nutritional gold mine! It is rich in vitamin B12, protein, iron, and essential fatty acids, making it ideal for boosting energy levels during the winter months. Spirulina is packed with more antioxidants like beta-carotene, which fights free radicals that cause skin aging and wrinkles. In addition, its high chlorophyll content helps detoxify the body of pollutants and toxins to which it has been exposed during the winter.

  1. Grenade:

Pomegranate is an excellent source of vitamin C, as well as potassium, calcium, and magnesium. The ruby ​​red seeds are also packed with powerful antioxidants like punicalagins that can reduce inflammation associated with colds and flu during the winter season. Its tangy flavor is a great way to spice up salads or smoothies when you need a little variety in your daily meals.

  1. Mushrooms :

Mushrooms come in all shapes and sizes, but they are definitely one of winter’s superfoods! Rich in vitamins B2 and D3 (which help boost immunity this season), mushrooms are an easy way to add extra nutrients to soups or stews without adding too many calories or fat. Plus, they’re packed with antioxidants, like ergothioneine, which can help protect against carcinogens in our environment and reduce damage caused by seasonal allergies.

  1. Kale :

Kale is high in vitamin K, which helps maintain bone health during the winter months! It is also rich in phytonutrients such as kaempferol, which can help prevent oxidative stress in cells due to its high antioxidant content – ​​perfect for keeping your body strong when temperatures drop! Plus, kale contains more fiber per calorie than any other green vegetable, making it a great choice for digestive health, too!

  1. Quinoa :

Quinoa is another nutritious option for the cooler months when fresh fruit is hard to find! Not only does it provide all 9 essential amino acids, making it a complete source of protein, but it’s also packed with magnesium. Which can help reduce stress hormones released during periods of anxiety or depression related to cold weather. Quinoa is a versatile ingredient that pairs well with sweet and savory dishes, so be sure to add it to your meal plans this winter!

  1. beets:

Beets pack a strong nutritional punch thanks to their high nitric oxide content, which helps improve blood circulation throughout the body – perfect for cold days when circulation can be difficult outside! Beets are also high in folate, essential for healthy cell development, and are full of natural sugars, giving them a uniquely sweet flavor that pairs well with salads and soups.

  1. blueberries:

Spicy cranberries aren’t just a delicious holiday side dish, they’re also incredibly nutritious! Rich in vitamin C, important for preventing colds and flu, cranberries also contain proanthocyanidin which helps keep the urinary tract healthy by preventing bacteria from sticking too closely to the walls, thus reducing the risk of infection during these cold months where illnesses they tend to have a spike. . Plus, the bright hue of blueberries adds a splash of color to dishes, so don’t forget about these festive favorites as winter approaches!

  1. Walnut seeds:

Eating nuts and seeds regularly during the winter provides your body with important minerals like phosphorus and selenium that support thyroid function while supporting healthy bones and teeth! Nuts and seeds are full of healthy fats that nourish skin cells. Additionally, many varieties, such as almonds, contain tryptophan which helps maintain serotonin levels and alleviates seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Remember not to overdo it; moderation is key as nuts and seeds contain a number of calories so enjoy them wisely during the winter season!

* HealthKey strives to convey health knowledge in a language accessible to all. In NO EVENT can the information provided replace the opinion of a health professional.

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Psychology & Diet

Incorporate these 8 foods rich in nitrates to build muscle mass

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Presse Santé

Are you looking to gain muscle mass without resorting to expensive supplements? If so, consider adding nitrate-rich foods to your diet. Not only will they help you gain more muscle and strength faster, but they will also improve your overall health! Nitrates are naturally occurring molecules that play an important role in vasodilation, the process of expanding blood vessels, helping to increase circulation and improve nutrient delivery throughout the body. With that in mind, here is a list of eight delicious foods rich in natural nitrates that will help you build healthy muscles while having fun.

  1. Beetroot:

One of the most well-known nitrate-rich foods, beets are a vegetable packed with vital nutrients and minerals. Not only is it high in nitrates, but it also contains betalains, powerful antioxidants that help reduce inflammation and increase athletic performance. Beets can be added to salads, smoothies, juices, and other foods for an added nutritional boost.

  1. Celery:

This crunchy vegetable is another great source of nitrates, containing about twice as many as beets. Celery is rich in vitamins and minerals that contribute to overall health, including heart health, and can be added to almost any meal for an extra nutritional boost. In addition to its nitrate content, celery contains a good amount of dietary fiber that aids in digestion.

  1. Lettuce :

Green leafy vegetables like lettuce are good sources of nitrates, as well as other essential nutrients like calcium and iron. Lettuce can be eaten raw or cooked in a variety of recipes and is a healthy and tasty food option for those looking to get more nitrates into their diet. Lettuce not only contains nitrates, but also vitamin A, which contributes to good vision and healthy skin.

  1. Carrots:

Carrots are generally considered a source of beta-carotene, but they are also an excellent source of nitrates! Eating carrots, cooked or raw, can fill you up with vitamin A, potassium, calcium, and magnesium—all essential nutrients for building muscle mass and reducing inflammation!

  1. Spinach :

This green leaf is a true concentrate of nutrition thanks to its abundance of vitamins A, E and K, as well as minerals such as manganese and zinc, not to mention dietary fiber! But what makes spinach unique among green vegetables is its high concentration of nitrates, making it the perfect vegetable for anyone looking to increase muscle growth naturally.

  1. Broccoli:

Broccoli is another superfood known for its multiple benefits when it comes to fighting diseases such as cancer thanks to its powerful antioxidant properties. On top of that, broccoli also contains significant amounts of dietary fiber and folate which help maintain proper nerve function, as well as copious amounts of calcium! Furthermore, it is also rich in nitrates, which makes this vegetable even more desirable for building muscle mass naturally.

  1. Dark chocolate :

Dark chocolate has long been known for its health benefits, and it turns out that one of those superstars is its high nitrate content. Nitrates are essential for muscle growth, and dark chocolate is often considered a healthier snack option than other sources of nitrates. Dark chocolate also provides a pre-workout energy boost, which can help build and maintain the muscles you build from your active lifestyle.

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Eating dark chocolate becomes even better when paired with other nitrate-rich foods, such as spinach, beets, and celery, to maximize the benefits of this beneficial nutrient. So go ahead and treat yourself to some healthy dark chocolate whenever you’re craving a pre-workout snack!

  1. Rhubarb:

Rhubarb may not be one of the most well-known bodybuilding foods, but it is in fact a great source of nitrates. High levels of nitrates in the diet, such as those found in rhubarb, stimulate an increase in nitric oxide in the blood. The presence of nitric oxide allows muscles to work longer and harder during exercise by increasing their efficiency and could therefore play an important role in certain physical activity endeavors.

Plus, its low sugar content means rhubarb can fit into almost any healthy eating plan without affecting insulin levels or providing too many excess calories. Overall, rhubarb is a safe and nutritious food worth considering when looking to optimize physical performance.

* HealthKey strives to convey health knowledge in a language accessible to all. In NO EVENT can the information provided replace the opinion of a health professional.

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